Workers – Preachers – Ministers – Servants – Evangelists – Laborers & the Work

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They term most frequently use to refer to their ministers is Workers. They are also referred to as servants of the Lord, missionaries, ministers, evangelists, preachers and laborers (all these terms refer to the same role/position). All active 2×2 ministers are said to be: in the Work.

Acts 13:2 – As they ministered to the Lord, and fasted, the Holy Ghost said, Separate me Barnabas and Saul for the work whereunto I have called them.

Acts 14:26 – And thence sailed to Antioch, from whence they had been recommended to the grace of God for the work which they fulfilled.

Acts 15:38 – But Paul thought not good to take him with them, who departed from them from Pamphylia, and went not with them to the work.

To become a minister is considered the highest calling and position in this church. Some parents pray for their children to enter the ministry.

2 Corinthians 6:1 – We then, as workers together with him, beseech you also that ye receive not the grace of God in vain.

Acts 14:26 – And thence sailed to Antioch, from whence they had been recommended to the grace of God for the work which they fulfilled.

Acts 15:38 – But Paul thought not good to take him with them, who departed from them from Pamphylia, and went not with them to the work.

The workers are also called laborers and fellow-laborers. They labor or work as missionaries in assigned areas called fields.

1 Corinthians 3:9 – For we are labourers together with God.

The Workers sometimes refer to their occupation as evangelists. In the early 19th century, many Workers emigrated from the U.K. to America. Ship manifests available on the Ellis Island website, show that the Workers gave their occupation as evangelist.

2 Timothy 4:5 – But watch thou in all things, endure afflictions, do the work of an evangelist, make full proof of thy ministry.

Male ministers are called Brother Workers, servants and bondservants. Female ministers are called Sister Workers, servants, handmaidens (which terms all refer the same position). The workers usually refer to each other as: companions, associates, colleagues or co-workers. About once a year, Workers usually exchange companions.

They believe that in the New Covenant, “your sons AND daughters shall prophesy,” (prophesy=preach)
(Joel 2:28-29 and quoted by Peter in Acts 2:28).

Acts 2:18 – And on my servants and on my handmaidens I will pour out in those days of my Spirit; and they shall prophesy:

After the sect started, the first three women preachers to enter the work in 1900 were Emma and Jennie Gill (sisters) and Sara Rogers. Read: (Women’s part in the Ministry).

Some consider the Workers to be the Lord’s anointed, and that to question them or disagree with them is going against the Lord’s anointed and may result in discipline.

1 Cor 1:21-22 – Now he which stablisheth us with you in Christ, and hath anointed us, is God; Who hath also sealed us, and given the earnest of the Spirit in our hearts.

1 Samuel 26:9 – …for who can stretch forth his hand against the Lord’s anointed, and be guiltless?

They believe the only ministry approved by God on earth is made up of men and women who follow Jesus’ instructions to His disciples in Matt. 10:5-14, Mark 6, Luke 9 (namely, them). The 2×2 Workers leave their homes, are itinerant, give away their possessions, are unmarried and preach in same sex pairs (two and two). There are no longer any married worker couples, although there were some in the past.

They don’t ask for contributions, accept no salary, taking literally Jesus’ command: freely give as you have freely received (Matt. 10:8). They do not work at jobs. They live frugally on money voluntarily given to them by professing Friends. They do not own property or automobiles. Members provide their transportation, including automobiles for their use. Their possessions fit into a suitcase. They do not attend seminary, take vows or receive man’s ordination. In the Early Days, workers took vows of poverty and celibacy, but this practice was discontinued.

In America, the workers stay as visitors in the homes of members in their field and move frequently from one household to another. In areas or countries where there are no members they can stay with, they may rent a small living quarter they call a bach.

Worker Quote: Marks of the True preacher

Worker Quote: Paul as a shepherd, worker, and evangelist are a good study. We have no right to call ourselves evangelists unless we have proved our ability. An evangelist is a herald of the gospel (Jack Carroll, Sidney, MB Canada Conv 1914).

Worker Quote: We are glad to tell those of you who are young, that there are two wonderful possibilities before you. The greatest and best is to put your life on God’s altar where it can be used wholly in the service of others. Let God make you a fisher of men, a minister of Christ’s Gospel. Not all are called to do this, but I’m sure if our young people were all letting God plan their lives there would not be such a dearth of laborers in the great Harvest Field. The need was never greater. God is still calling. Don’t turn a deaf ear to that call. Second to this is the possibility of being a saint and possibly having a home that could be used in the service of God (Ed Cornock, 1965 Denver Conv.).

Worker Quote: There are two wonderful possibilities before you [who are young]. The greatest and best is to put your life on God’s altar where it can be used wholly in the service of others. Let God make you a fisher of men, a minister of Christ’s Gospel. Second to this is the possibility of being a saint and possibly having a home that could be used in the service of God. (Ed Cornock, 1965 Denver Conv.)